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3885 S. Decatur Blvd Suite #1080
Las Vegas, NV 89103

Sunday, 03 March 2024 00:00

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning? If so, you should seek the professional help of your podiatrist and have a proper diagnosis performed. Heel pain can be caused by several different foot-related conditions.

Tuesday, 27 February 2024 00:00

Chronic plantar fasciitis pain, which occurs in the heel or bottom of the foot, can impact both daily activities and overall well-being. Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes. Plantar fasciitis pain is generally considered chronic when it lasts several months and worsens over time. People with long-term pain from plantar fasciitis have options available to manage the pain and improve quality of life. Custom orthotics, which can provide tailored foot support, can alleviate pressure on the feet.  There are additional treatment options that podiatrists may recommend on a case-by-case basis, such as laser therapy or corticosteroid injections. Surgery is sometimes used on patients who do not respond to more conservative treatment methods. If you have chronic foot pain due to plantar fasciitis, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can guide you toward appropriate treatment options.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Loren Hansen, DPM  from Ankle & Foot Medical Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Las Vegas, NV . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Tuesday, 20 February 2024 00:00

Arthritis in the toe, a common ailment affecting many individuals, manifests through various symptoms that can significantly impact daily life. Persistent toe pain, particularly during movement or weight-bearing activities, are hallmark symptoms of toe arthritis. Individuals may experience stiffness and limited range of motion in the affected toe, making tasks like walking, bending, and standing challenging and painful. Swelling and inflammation surrounding the toe joint are also common symptoms of arthritis, indicating underlying joint damage and inflammation. As arthritis progresses, individuals may notice changes in the appearance and alignment of the toe, such as swelling, deformities, and bone spurs. Additionally, toe arthritis can cause instability and weakness in the affected joint, leading to difficulty bearing weight and maintaining balance. If you are experiencing toe pain, it is strongly suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can diagnose the cause, and offer appropriate relief and treatment options.

Toe pain can disrupt your daily activities. If you have any concerns, contact Loren Hansen, DPM of Ankle & Foot Medical Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Causes Toe Pain?

Most severe toe pain is caused due to a sports injury, trauma from dropping something heavy on the toe, or bumping into something rigid. Other problems can develop over time for various reasons.

Toe pain can be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Trauma
  • Sports injury
  • Wearing shoes that are too tight
  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Corns and calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Blisters
  • Ingrown toenails
  • Sprains
  • Fractures (broken bones)
  • Dislocations

When to See a Podiatrist

  • Severe pain
  • Persistent pain that lasts more than a week
  • Signs of infection
  • Continued swelling
  • Pain that prevents walking

Diagnosis

In many cases the cause of toe pain is obvious, but in others, a podiatrist may want to use more advanced methods to determine the problem. These can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatments for toe pain and injuries vary and may include shoe inserts, padding, taping, medicines, injections, and in some cases, surgery. If you believe that you have broken a toe, please see a podiatrist as soon as possible.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Las Vegas, NV . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Toe Pain
Tuesday, 13 February 2024 00:00

Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, can cause crampy, painful sensations in the legs during walking, often dismissed as mere exertion or aging. However, it is important not to overlook these symptoms, as PAD stems from fatty deposits that obstruct blood flow in the arteries outside the heart and brain. The lack of blood flow to the lower extremities can result in serious foot problems. Risk factors of peripheral artery disease include smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Classic PAD pain, known as claudication, typically occurs in the calf and subsides with rest. But other signs, like coldness, discoloration, or slow-healing sores in the feet may indicate inadequate blood supply, necessitating prompt treatment. Early detection via tests like the ankle-brachial index is vital, with lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy diet, and regular exercise, playing a key role in PAD management. Walking enhances blood flow in smaller leg arteries, creating alternative pathways to alleviate pain. Health experts recommend at least 30 minutes of walking, three times a week, for individuals with peripheral artery disease, to help slow the progression and associated complications. For help with the foot problems linked to PAD, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as quickly as possible.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Loren Hansen, DPM from Ankle & Foot Medical Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Las Vegas, NV . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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